Artificial Intelligence Makes Greener Bike Share Schemes

Since the first coin operated Bike Share Scheme was introduced in Copenhagen in 1995, the health and environmental benefits of Bike Sharing have been widely recognised. If people choose to ride a bike, they aren’t driving a car, riding in a taxi or using mass transit systems. They’re exercising and reducing congestion across a city.

 

That’s all true but we’re seeing that Artificial Intelligence (AI) is able to maximise the positive environmental impact of Bike Share Schemes and make them even more sustainable. Bike Share Schemes that implement an AI platform can push their schemes towards carbon neutrality and demonstrate that they are taking climate change seriously.

 

We have seen it in the schemes that our BICO AI optimisation platform is deployed in. The data shows that AI can directly impact how a Bike Share functions within a city and optimise its operations, reducing CO2 emissions.

 

The biggest impact AI can have is simply getting more people to use a scheme. As mentioned, that means they aren’t using another mode of transport and a city and its citizens are healthier. BICO ensures that users can get the bikes they want where they want them and docks are available at the end of their journey. That makes it convenient to use a Bike Share Scheme and incorporate it into their daily routine.

 

We’ve seen ridership growth across these schemes after they’ve deployed BICO:

 

  • Divvy Bikes, Chicago: Ridership increased by 0.75 Rides Per Day
  • MIBICI, Guadalajara: Ridership increased by 1.5 Rides Per Day
  • City Bikes, Helsinki: Ridership increased by 5 Rides Per Day

 

These numbers are per bike, per day. That’s a huge jump in places like Helsinki, which has a big impact on the benefit the scheme is delivering. This is also combined with more efficient redistribution of bikes across a scheme that translates into a reduced carbon footprint for the schemes operations.

 

Our platform enables the redistribution of bikes to be optimised so that fewer trucks take fewer trips to achieve the best possible results for users.  Over the last year, Bike Share Schemes that use BICO have reduced the amount of time redistribution trucks spend on the road while also cutting the distance they travel by 10,000 miles. That means less CO2 generated by the trucks and a lower carbon footprint for the scheme.

 

BICO is also responsible for 100,000 less bikes needing to be moved, due to the precise and optimal decision making of AI. By streamlining the processes of multiple Bike Share Schemes, we have seen the reduction of up to 10 metric tonnes of CO2 emissions as a direct result of less redistribution trucks being on the road. This has enabled these Bike Share Schemes to take one step closer to their goal of delivering a carbon neutral operation.

 

It all adds up to a clean mode of transport being even cleaner with the use of AI.

 

Let us know if you’d like to learn more about how we support Bike Share Schemes with AI: info@stageintelligence.co.uk

The Positive and Powerful Story Building Around AI

Over the last 12 months or so, questions or concerns about Artificial Intelligence (AI) have largely faded away. It isn’t that the general public has got all the answers they need about AI but more that AI is becoming a reality in more and more of our homes and places of work.

 

In our business, we’ve seen skepticism turn to excitement when we talk about the potential of AI to optimise how they operate. There’s a comfort level that is growing and we believe acceptance of AI will only accelerate over the next 12 months.

 

AI is often in action behind-the-scenes making user experiences more enjoyable and easing the workload for businesses. We’ve seen it implemented in our homes in smart home-hubs or news stories about AI helping to identify cancer or potential heart attacks. AI has a positive story and real-world applications that are putting fears to rest.

 

At the same time, research firm Gartner has confirmed that AI is creating more jobs, rather than taking them. By 2025, the amount of jobs generated by AI will have reached 2 million, according to the firm. That’s a big change from the common idea that AI kills jobs and makes people redundant.

 

Gartner shares our view that AI frees workers to focus on other tasks and enables them to go beyond routine tasks. Instead of seeing AI as a competitor, workers can see AI as a companion and a way to excel at a given task. AI becomes a critical tool in problem solving not a substitute for a human.

 

Gartner notes that in 2021, AI augmentation will generate $2.9 trillion in business value and recover 6.2 billion hours of worker productivity. We see this directly in the Bike Share Schemes that have deployed our BICO AI optimisation platform. They augment their operations with AI, which in turn drives revenue growth through increased ridership while maximising the potential of the workforce.

 

As worries about AI fade, businesses across different industries are starting to realise that AI can be extremely beneficial to them if applied correctly. Global technology research company ISG, discovered that although at present only 16% of businesses utilise AI, in 2019 that figure will rise to 51%.

 

There are a lot of different drivers for that but part of it is that the potential of AI is becoming widely understood and it is delivering real competitive advantages. Businesses that don’t explore the potential in AI potentially will miss out or see their competitors move faster and with more precision than them.

 

In the increasingly competitive micro-mobility market, we believe AI will be a clear differentiator and be a driver for user and revenue growth. AI isn’t an idea anymore, it is having a direct impact on how citizens enjoy and move across a city. The skepticism is gone and now adoption is only going to accelerate.

 

Get in touch if you’d like to learn more about how we’re using AI to optimise micro-mobility: info@stageintelligence.co.uk  

Bike Sharing and Micro-Mobility Shifted Gears in 2018

2018 was the year where Bike Sharing and Micro-Mobility showed its potential to change urban spaces and the transportation industry as a whole. Docked or dockless Bikes, e-Bikes, scooters, e-scooters and a whole range of new mobility options have become the most exciting and innovative sector in transportation.

 

If we go back 15 years, there were just four Bike Sharing Schemes. In 2018, there were more than 1,600 globally, according to Bike Sharing consultancy MetroBike. These schemes account for 18.2 million public-use bikes available around the world, nearly double the number from four years ago.

 

Growth is expected to remain in double digits for the next eight years at least. Research and Markets expects global Bike-Sharing market to grow at a Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of 12.5% between 2018 and 2026.

 

At the same time, schemes are diversifying and going beyond traditional Bike Share models. In the spring of 2018, multiple US cities started facilitating electric scooter services, which lead to 3.6% of people claiming to use the sharing-scheme. An impressive statistic, considering the market was only made available to the public less than 12 months previously.

 

Inside a Populus report – The Micro-Mobility Revolution – they highlighted that 70% of their respondents viewed electric scooters as a positive addition to urban areas – predominantly as they’re more convenient for shorter journeys, compliment public transport and extend their choices of transport as a whole.

 

In April, we saw the beginning of convergence between mobility platforms with Uber’s acquisition of Jump Bikes in April. Uber signalled it would be adding additional ways to move around your city directly from the Uber app. It has recognised the value of micro-mobility to its future and is prepared to spend capital and resource to get in the game.

 

The market is changing fast and that’s exciting but it hasn’t all been good news.

 

In China, a dockless Bike Sharing system was launched that charged cyclists just pennies for a half-an-hour ride. However, the initiative out-grew its demand, meaning there were too many bikes and not enough riders. The bikes were dumped –  in the streets, sometimes in rivers – and that lead to them being laid to rest in ‘bike cemeteries”.

 

In May 2018, the city of San Francisco temporarily banned electric scooters after residents complained of congested streets and illegal parking. The city received 1,900 complaints about the new vehicles. In August, San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency announced Scoot and Skip as the winners of its e-scooter pilot sweepstakes, bringing e-scooters back to the city.

 

Across the Micro-Mobility industry, growth is being matched with experimentation and a healthy skepticism from local authorities. As in any rapidly evolving market, we are going to see more successes and failures in the next 12 months with efficient and consistent scheme management being a common challenge. No matter what type of scheme is being operated, end users need an optimised experience and operators need an efficient way to manage them.

 

As the market grows in complexity, Stage Intelligence uses its BICO AI optimisation platform to solve these challenges and simplify how schemes are managed. As our industry goes to a new level, we’re taking scheme management to new places with Artificial Intelligence.

 

Please get in touch if you’d like to know more about how we can help you get the most out of your Bike Sharing Scheme:  info@stageintelligence.co.uk

Simplifying and Accelerating Micro-Mobility in 2019

In 2018, we took our business to a new level and put a foundation in place to continue our growth globally whilst utilising our technology to solve new challenges. It was also the most exciting and successful year Stage Intelligence has had to date. We executed our vision for AI-optimised mobility and our partners are seeing the results every day.

This year we met partners across the globe, had more productive conversations, and listened to a growing number of operators as they look to innovate their operations. At every event I attend, I’m reminded of how young, fresh and exciting the Micro-Mobility market is. Everyone is looking at ways to deliver for end users, improve and expand their operations across urban areas or with new modes of transport.

It really feels like 2018 was a landmark year for Micro-Mobility in terms of growth and recognition. The pace of change has been amazing, and the ups and downs throughout the year have shown how important it is to have simple and powerful solutions for managing an increasingly complex mobility landscape.

That’s where we are creating real long-term value for our partners no matter how their organisations evolve in the future. From start-up operators through to the largest Bike Share Schemes in the world, our platform is simplifying and accelerating how they operate.

I’m extremely proud of all that our team has achieved in 2018 and we saw what we are capable of. I know we can continue to build on our success and not only enable more partners to benefit from our platform, but also enable more users to experience the best Micro-Mobility service possible. I believe we can play a critical role in creating sustainable mobility options, businesses and urban environments and that is an exciting prospect in 2019 and beyond.

We’re Moving Fast

At the beginning of the year, our BICO AI optimisation platform was live in two Bike Share Schemes, and by December 2018 it had been deployed in 15 schemes across three continents. Our growth has been transformational for our business. We’re operating in a range of unique environments and have shown that we can scale to serve some of the world’s largest and most dynamic schemes. Smaller schemes that have adopted BICO have also seen the benefits of adopting AI within their schemes, making them more cost efficient enabling them to grow and scale efficiently. There really aren’t any limits on where we can deploy our platform and have positive impacts on operational performance.

In July, we announced our deployment in Helsinki with CityBike Finland OY from which it has grown to be our most successful scheme in terms of ridership. After deploying BICO, CityBike Finland saw ridership grow by five riders per bike per day. That means more citizens are using the available bikes and the scheme is growing its profitability, shown by another expansion planned for the coming season – It’s a win-win for the city, operator and the users.

In Latin America, we partnered with Tembici to deploy BICO in cities across Brazil including Rio de Janeiro, Sao Paulo, Recife, Salvador, Port Alegre and Vila Velha. Our phase two deployments include Santiago, Chile, and Buenos Aires, Argentina. This is a major leap forward for our presence in South America and a vote of confidence in our platform. Tembici believes in BICO and will utilise the platform to scale their operations across Latin America and beyond.

In Europe, we’re working with Smovengo and have deployed BICO across the Velib in Paris, France. We’re extremely proud to see BICO live in the largest Bike Share Scheme in the Western world, and increasing the usability of more than 21,000 bikes of which 7000 will be electric. It’s a major milestone for our business and really shows that no matter the size of scheme, season, vehicle type or weather, BICO can drive efficiencies for our partners.

Each of these BICO deployments shows the potential of our business to directly influence the future of Micro-Mobility globally, and enable the success and growth of more operators across the world. With every scheme we add we’re evolving, refining and improving our platform. Each scheme adds something new and drives our platforms features and functionalities forward.

Priorities in 2019

Since becoming CEO of Stage Intelligence in 2018, I’ve been focused on continually pushing our business forward and building on and adding to our successes. The biggest challenge in AI and Micro-Mobility is remaining focused on where we add value and not try to chase every opportunity. We have to stay aligned with our original purpose. We make solving complex challenges simple for our partners.

In 2019, we’re going to build on our core strengths and use all we’ve learned to expand into some new areas. I see 2019 as a year where we add some new dimensions to BICO and find some interesting ways to add value for our partners.

There are six areas that we are going to prioritise in the 2019:

  • Nurturing Our Core – We will continue to grow the number of Bike Share Schemes we’re deployed in and support more operators globally. There are more than 1,600 Bike Share Schemes globally and we know that we can help them to operate efficiently and deliver an optimised experience for users. I see huge potential in North America, and we’ll be making a big push in the market in 2019.
  • Adding New Capabilities – We’re expanding what our platform can do for our partners. We’re adding new support for managing broken bikes, electric bikes and optimised battery management. Operators need a more efficient way to deal with maintenance and we see an opportunity for BICO to help them solve these challenges.
  • Supporting Hybrid Models – We’re looking at ways to support Hybrid Bike Share models where docked and dockless systems are integrated. Depending on the exact model, bikes can be docked at physical docking stations, “virtual docking stations” or remain free-floating. It adds new complexity to scheme management but ultimately offers a flexible user experience. The challenge is to help operators manage their bikes and ensure they are available when and where they’re needed.
  • Deliver Micro-Mobility Through a Single Pane – As the number of modes of transport grow across a city, we’re developing ways to visualise the entire Micro-Mobility landscape in an urban area. Operators want to see and understand their entire operating environment through a simple, optimised dashboard. They want to gain insights from data and make faster decisions. Micro-Mobility will only grow in complexity and we’re finding ways to make it simpler to manage.
  • Growing Our Team – In 2019, we’re going to continue to grow our team and bring on board new skills and talent. We added Alex Churchill to the team at the end of 2018 to expand our AI expertise, and he brings new perspective and insights to our operation. Our AI platform is delivering amazing results and we want to continue to refine and optimise it. The tech team will grow as well as we expand our platform, while sales and marketing will also see new additions.
  • Continued Execution for Partners – The most important thing is that we continue to execute for partners and deliver the results we’re capable of. The numbers show precisely the kind of impact we can have on a scheme within months. Each scheme we work with sees cost-savings and new growth in their ridership. It is that simple. We just need to keep delivering for partners.

This Time Next Year

This time next year I think the Micro-Mobility market will have had another year of huge growth and disruption. Personally, we will have double digit growth in the number of schemes we’re deployed in and our platform will support more diverse needs of our partners.

There will be more modes of transport deployed in cities across the globe and the need for a simpler, faster and easier way to manage schemes will only grow. We’re going to work closely with partners to collaborate and co-create features or solutions that solve their challenges. If we keep listening to their needs, the potential in our business is limitless.

Part of this is about getting out in the market and to even more events. We’re going to be sharing our ideas, data and results. I want to evangelise AI in Micro-Mobility and share our partners’ success stories. I see an opportunity for us to offer consultancy to new partners and really act as a trusted advisor for new schemes that are launching, or existing schemes that want to go to a new level.

There has never been a more exciting time in our business and our industry and I’m looking forward to a huge 2019.

Using Autonomous Vehicles To Manage Bike Share Schemes of the Future

While fully autonomous cars are still years away from being a mode of transportation that we can use day-to-day. We think it could have a positive impact on Bike Share Scheme management in the future.

 

With 68% of the world population projected to live in urban areas by 2050, we believe the future of mobility lies in simpler, cleaner and space saving modes of transportation like walking or cycling. Autonomous cars could play a big part in this.

 

In Bike Share Schemes, driverless cars could open up new opportunities in optimising management to deliver a better scheme to its riders. It can make the redistribution of bikes in the future much easier and more cost-efficient for the operator. Data, Artificial Intelligence (AI) and autonomous technology can all interlink to carry out traditional operational processes.

 

Currently, operators have to rely on manual processes for redistribution with trucks and vehicles being led by operational staff. That requires a significant amount of internal planning on where the drivers need to be, at what time and taking into account shift breaks and patterns.

 

Fortunately, Bike Share operators now have a lot of tools and technology at their fingertips that can help optimise and manage this. AI-based management platforms are helping operators with a lot of the heavy lifting and giving operators the most optimum way to manage operational staff.

 

In a future where driverless cars are commonplace, we can see Bike Share Scheme management moving towards the use of this technology. It has the potential to directly connect with management platforms to optimise how the redistribution trucks move, where they go and how often they go there. That can all be done with minimal human interaction.

 

For Bike Share Scheme operators this can remove the limits on rebalancing its bikes and offer a better and more reliable scheme to its riders. When Bike Share Schemes are better managed, operators can reduce costs and accelerate rider experience.

 

You are able to accurately serve the local market and ensure bikes are available when and where it’s needed. That supports the move towards shared integrated transportation and gets more people cycling.

 

Autonomous cars have a lot of potential for Bike Share Schemes and wider transportation in general, but it is still very far away from reality. At Stage, we’re always looking at the future and seeing how complex challenges of today could be solved by the technologies of tomorrow.

 

We’re excited to see what new technology will bring to the growing shared mobility market and how we can best incorporate it to deliver smarter processes to the wider industry.

 

Please get in touch if you’d like to know more about how we support Bike Share operators with a simplified management processes: tom.nutley(@)stageintelligence.co.uk

 

 

Delivering New Visibility to Bike Share Operations with Spin-off Environments

Management of Bike Share Schemes often come second to operators that are looking to expand to new markets globally. Today, operators can gain new visibility into their existing Bike Share operations by testing in a spin-off environment.

 

A spin-off environment simulates an operator’s current redistribution and management processes in a particular market to find new operational efficiencies. It looks at variables such as the number of trucks in use, capacity of these vehicles, staff shift patterns and other factors to assess if resources can be better utilised.

 

When Bike Share operators have visibility into how their schemes are run they can make quick decisions that can help reduce cost, win riders and grow in local and global markets.

 

Platforms that offer spin-off environments on-demand give Bike Share operators a huge advantage in the local market. With redistribution accounting for over 30% of the total operational costs, spin-off environments enable operators to reduce internal resources and optimise rebalancing to maximise their bottom lines.

 

In an increasingly multi-vendor state, where more than one Bike Share operator compete in the local market, the winners are the ones that are efficiently testing operations and managing resources. It gives them significant cost savings compared to its competitors, build strong ridership through better rebalancing and grow.

 

Operators can see the impact of managing resources with a spin-off environment. They are not unnecessarily spending huge amounts of money and time adding new resources. They gain real insights into management and can build a strong redistribution strategy.

 

Bike Share operators around the world now have the opportunity to test their management processes in spin-off environments. They have the ability to better optimise and manage their schemes day-to-day.

 

From the partners we’ve worked with they have seen real value in the testing in a spin-off environment. They were able to turn up their operations locally with very minimal increases in internal resources. That’s a big win for us. Our goal is to help operators reduce cost through better management of their existing resources.

 

We are able to work closely with operators and leverage our platform’s capabilities to spin-off environments on-demand. They see new opportunities in their operations that can help them compete more efficiently in the local market. They see results almost instantly, reducing the risk of managing a Bike Share Scheme.

 

If you are interested in finding out how our BICO platform is able to spin-off environment on-demand and deliver actionable insights into new markets, please contact us: tom.nutley(@)stageintelligence.co.uk.

4 Reasons Why Scheduled Bike Share Redistribution Doesn’t Work

The biggest challenge in Bike Share Schemes is to provide an optimised service each and every time. Operators that choose schedule-based distribution are often limited in their rebalancing efforts and are not efficiently serving the local rider demand. That impacts ridership and rider experience as a whole.

It’s up to the operators to ensure they have a simple and optimised management process that’s tailored to the cities and the riders. It enables them to offer better services, build stronger ridership and reduce operational costs. Yet many operators still choose to carry out schedule-based redistribution.

Schedule-based distribution means drivers have pre-set information or a schedule of how many bikes to pick-up and drop-off and at what locations. The schedule is created irrespective of the city it’s operating in or its specific needs. This can often mean that by the time the first job is completed the whole schedule could be wrong.

Poor rebalancing and management processes can also add to the growing situation of bikes being left as a nuisance to cities and its citizens. Singapore has seen first-hand the impact of poorly managed resources that have a huge effect on the day-to-day lives of its residents.

To combat indiscriminate bike parking, The Land Transport Authority (LTA) in Singapore passed a legislation earlier this year aimed at tackling this issue for over 100,000 bikes in the area. Since then it has introduced several new measures including reduced fleet size and Bike Share licences to ensure operators are better managing their schemes.

It is now more important than ever to have a smart management process that takes the guess work away from Bike Share redistribution.

Here’s four reasons why schedule-based redistribution doesn’t work for modern Bike Share Schemes:

 

  1. Dynamic Nature of the City

Cities globally are different from one another. They all have different population, city topography, transport hubs and many other factors that make each and every city unique. A schedule that works well in one city could completely fail in another.

  1. Each Day is Different

The day itself plays a huge role in Bike Share ridership. When you combine the changing weather, major city events, transport strikes and a number of other things, the demand for Bike Share Schemes are likely to fluctuate on a daily basis.

  1. Evolving Rider Behaviour

Some riders may take a bike out every morning and every evening to commute between work and home. That makes it predictable and easy to manage. In reality, for many riders their behaviour is constantly changing. Increase in tourists or a rise in public transportation services could affect the demand for bikes in different areas.

  1. Inefficient Use of Staff

What we see every day with schedule-based distribution is that drivers are going from one location to another with no real insights. They often go to a docking station that is expected to be empty and find that it is full. This is huge waste of time, money and resources.

For modern Bike Share Schemes, scheduled-based redistribution doesn’t work. There are too many variables that make schedule-based redistribution time-consuming and inefficient. Operators instead need simpler and smarter processes that can predict demand and manage resources with accuracy.

At Stage Intelligence, we use four weeks of prior ridership data to track rider behaviour and mange redistribution effectively. We predict replenishment values up to 12 hours in advance to enable operators to make quick decision and move quickly to win new riders.

Please get in touch if you’d like to find out how we use data and AI to transform Bike Share redistribution: tom.nutley(@)stageintelligence.co.uk

Delivering On-demand Team Management to Bike Share Operators

Bike Share operators around the world are looking for easier and better ways to manage its operations and operational staff. They need solutions that can make internal team management simple and reliable.

Today, Bike Share operators are struggling with outdated team creation and management processes that restrict how they carry out their day-to-day tasks. They are burdened with manual inputting, time implications and constant miscommunications internally.

When your operational staff are not working together efficiently, your whole scheme could be at risk. Your redistribution and internal operations are not optimised and that could have a negative impact for your riders.

It’s why team management has been a big priority for us. Operators are looking for easier ways for its distribution teams to work together, communicate and collaborate. In BICO version 15.1.0, we made it simple to create and manage multiple teams.

Operational staff can now set up teams in real-time without the need to do so in advance. They are free to start their day and update the app as they pick up new job requests. It saves valuable time and effort for staff and enables them to operate more efficiently when redistributing the bikes.

Bike Share operators really benefit from a dynamic management platform that can keep up with the changing industry. You’ll see better optimised internal processes that enable your teams to work together to better serve the market. That gives riders complete confidence in your scheme.

Riders can trust that your bikes and resources are available when and where they need them. They can rely on your scheme to get to their end location each and every time. That builds strong ridership and helps you grow locally and around the globe.

In BICO v15.1.0, we’ve worked closely with our partners to add new features including:

 

  • Simple Team Creation

Our BICO Android application lets users create teams with the app by selecting a User Name, Shift, Break Time, Vehicle, Depot and Team Name, which can be easily edited.

 

  • User Verification

The latest BICO update includes a simple user verification process that can be set up by entering the username and password. This is an optional feature and can be turned on or off.

 

  • Usability & Stability Improvements

BICO 15.1.0 also comes with a range of usability improvements, general bug fixes and stability improvements.

 

At Stage Intelligence, we’re continually updating our app to deliver a simpler, faster and better way to manage a Bike Share Scheme. We’re improving the usability, stability and performance of the app while adding new features to give partners around the globe a reliable Artificial Intelligence (AI) platform.

 

If you’d like to find out more about the latest BICO update and how that impacts Bike Share operators around the globe, please get in touch: tom.nutley(@)stageintelligence.co.uk

Are Bike Share Scheme Operators Ready for the GDPR Regulation?

The EU’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is a European privacy law that was approved by the European Commission in 2016. It will apply to all EU member states from 25th May 2018 and replace the current Data Protection Act 1998.

 

Among other things, the GDPR considers how organisations collect, use, store and manage personal data of EU citizens. Data collectors will be required to process personal data lawfully, transparently and for a specific purpose.

 

For Bike Share Schemes, this will have a significant impact on their operations across Europe. Its business model relies on collecting and using vast amounts of personal data such as names, addresses and credit card details to offer bike sharing services to its users.

 

Many believe it’s the data mining aspect of Bike Sharing that has attracted billions in investment. During 2017, market leaders Mobike and ofo announced that it secured $600 million and $700 million in funding respectively.

 

As GDPR is implemented across the EU, it is likely to impact both the operators and the investors as well. It will limit what organisations are able to do with the data whilst pushing operators to better align their data collection and handling processes.

 

Here’s some of the main principles of GDPR that we see impacting Bike Share operators:

 

  • Wider Scope of the regulation

GDPR applies to all organisations that operate in the EU or handle personal data of EU citizens no matter where the organisation operates. It also has a broader scope of the definition for personal data and now includes data such as IP addresses, behavioural data, location data, and financial information.

 

  • Increased Individual Rights

Individuals have new rights under the GDPR including the right to access the data, right to rectify incorrect information, right to restrict processing, right to portability and right to object certain uses of data.

 

  • Stricter Consent

Consent is one of the main aspects of GDPR. It is important to obtain explicit consent from individuals for distinct purposes with a proof of record stating when and how consent was given. GDPR does allow for ‘soft’ opt-in which enables organisation to send marketing messages for similar products or services as long as individuals are given the opportunity to opt-out at any time.

 

  • Transparent Processing

Individuals can request how their information is processed. Operators need to clarify the purpose in which the data was collected and should ensure that the purpose is limited and the data collected is as minimised as possible.

 

Bike Share operators across the EU will need to ensure they comply with the new GDPR. We recommend reviewing the current consent and data management process in terms of how operators seek, record and manage consent and whether it meets the GDPR standard.

 

Operators should also consider appointing individuals to take responsibility for data protection compliances. In some cases, it may be necessary to have a Data Protection Officer (DPO) under the GDPR.

 

It is also important that all organisations that work on an operator’s behalf follows the stricter regulations. The GDPR applies to data processors as well as the data controllers when handling personal data.

 

At Stage Intelligence, we are experienced in handling personal data and ensuring that it meets the local and regional directives. Our partners around the world rely on us to manage information with the strictest confidence. We store and use data securely and our processes are optimised to support the growth of our partners.

 

To ensure all existing and new processes within your Bike Share operation meet the GDPR standard, we recommend consulting with GDPR lawyers and professionals.

 

To find out more about how Stage Intelligence can support your Bike Share Scheme with streamlined data management processes, please contact tom.nutley(@)stageintelligence.co.uk

Bike Share: The Foundation for Mobility as a Service

Bike Share Schemes can be the foundation for developing Mobility as a Service (MaaS) in an urban city. It has a proven model that supports the deployment of MaaS across many different areas.

 

MaaS integrates various forms of transport services into a single mobility solution. It combines a range of services from trains and buses to taxis and bike sharing to offer a tailor-made transport solution that connects you door-to-door.

 

Bike Share Schemes make it easier to facilitate the move towards MaaS. MaaS operators can take advantage of its large user base and learn from its management approach to drive efficiency beyond Bike Share.

 

We believe a well-run Bike Share Scheme is the foundation for MaaS models. It supports the move away from personally owned vehicles to modes of transportation that are just as effective and cost-efficient whilst better connecting existing transportation.

 

Research by DTimes and ofo has found that shared bikes have the ability to seamlessly interlink existing transport infrastructure. Bike Share Schemes make it easy for users to access other transport links as well get to their final destination.

 

When residents can rely on transportation services to fully connect them to where they need to go, they are likely to use the services again and on a regular basis. That can facilitate the move towards MaaS initiatives in the future.

 

We are seeing the growth of MaaS apps such as Whim in Helsinki that could soon be the norm for modern transport around the world. It provides the convenience of private vehicle travel without the need of ownership particularly when on average cars are parked for over 95% of the time.

 

For cities looking to adopt MaaS models and transform the culture of personal vehicles, simplifying and optimising Bike Share Schemes should be the first step. It makes the financial and convenience case for using public and private means of transport over own personal vehicles.

 

With MaaS, operators and city officials gain complete visibility across a cityscape. It provides a clear picture of its users and their transportation needs. Visibility can be matched with technology such as AI to optimise all journeys in the urban city.

 

At Stage Intelligence, we are leaders in Bike Share Scheme management and hold a track record of simplifying operations around the world using our AI technology. We combine data and AI to deliver actionable insights that makes the management of Bike Share simple and efficient for operators.

 

To find out more about how Stage Intelligence can optimise your Bike Share Schemes with its AI platform, please contact tom.nutley(@)stageintelligence.co.uk